Involuntary Commitment Part III: A System Built on Lies

Involuntary commitment and forced psychiatric drugging are based on several lies and misrepresentations, all of them broadly and continuously disseminated for decades by the psychiatric industry and its allies. Among them are the following: Mental and emotional problems are best understood as the result of abnormal brain chemistry (imbalances in neurotransmitters). Antipsychotic drugs are substantially

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Involuntary Commitment in Washington State – Part II

In Part 1 of this series on involuntary commitment we reviewed the criteria under which a person can be involuntarily committed. Broadly speaking, the criteria –   showing a “substantial likelihood of serious harm” or “gravely disability” – define individuals who are considered mentally ill and have engaged in behavior which suggests they are a danger

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Involuntary Commitment in Washington State – Part 1

The laws governing involuntary commitment in Washington State are lengthy and complex. Understanding the law requires 1) knowing a few basic definitions and 2) learning the legal process by which someone can be committed. This first article describes the process by which an individual can initially be taken into custody by the state and involuntarily

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No Expectation of Recovery in Public Mental Health

[Excerpt from King County Ordinance 13974] – emphasis in red added] Promoting recovery has become the rallying point for the consumer and family movement (1999 Mental Health Report from the Surgeon General). Throughout 1999 the public debate about mental health issues raised expectations about the recovery model as mentioned by providers, clients, advocates and citizens.

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Warehousing In a Major Mental Health System

Abstract Over the past decade, proposals to transform our nation’s mental health system have called for an end to the “warehousing” of system clients and the provision of services that promote recovery.  In King County, Washington, efforts would also appear to be underway to establish a recovery-based system.  But outcome reports from the King County

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King County Mental Health – Lack of Results

This report is so damning of the mental health system, they do not want you to see the report. You can go to the King County mental health website and you will not see this report. You have to know it exists and ask for it. NOTE:  One of these reports is available elsewhere online –

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Lack of Health Outcomes

Update on Outcome Reporting in the Washington State Mental Health System I. The JLARC report In 2000, the Washington State Joint Legislative Audit and Review Committee produced a report entitled Mental Health System Performance Audit analyzing the Washington State Mental Health System.* This report had been requested by the Washington State Legislature. The report noted

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Washington State Results

Only 5.7% – 12.5% of adults achieve meaningful improvement in their psychological and social functioning after receiving treatment (WSIPP report 2008). Poor results are corroborated statewide. Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) was directed by the 2001  Washington State legislature to conduct long-term outcomes studies of clients of the Washington State public mental health system. 

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